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List of Universities in Germany that accept Thanawiya Amma

Are you thinking of studying in Germany? The best German universities according to the Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings 2020 include prestigious old institutions alongside younger technical universities.

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The top universities in Germany are scattered throughout the country, with options to study in Munich, Berlin and 40 other cities. These universities accept the Egyptian Thanawiya Amma for admission.

LMU Munich

With the second largest student population of any university in Germany, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich – to use its full name – attracts a huge number of international students, about 13 per cent of the total student body.

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LMU Munich was founded in 1472, making it one of the oldest universities in the country. It is affiliated with 42 Nobel laureates, including renowned scientists such as Otto Hahn, Max Planck and Werner Heisenberg.

Since the end of the 18th century the university has had a strong focus on natural sciences, and since the middle of the 19th century it has produced world-leading research, discoveries and innovations.

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The German Universities Excellence Initiative, launched in 2005, has poured funding into LMU Munich, as well as other leading universities in the country.

Technical University of Munich

Founded in the 19th century, the TUM is the only state university dedicated to science and technology.

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The university originally focused on engineering, but has expanded over the years to include natural sciences, social sciences, agriculture, brewing and food technology, and medicine. Many specialisms within engineering and information technology are offered across three departments.

An overarching philosophy of “the entrepreneurial university” guides the development of the institution, which now has 15 departments across three campuses in and around Munich.

Since 1927, 17 Nobel prizes have been awarded in physics, chemistry and medicine to academics affiliated to the university.

In 2001, the TUM founded a subsidiary university, TUM Asia, in Singapore, providing an international education to students in Asia.

Heidelberg University

Heidelberg University, founded in 1386, is the oldest university in Germany.

The university offers undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in 160 study programmes. Academics at Heidelberg have been responsible for founding sub-disciplines including psychiatric genetics, modern sociology and environmental physics.

Close to 20 per cent of the student body is international, representing 130 countries. More than a third of doctoral students are international.

The university particularly excels for its innovative research and intellectual contributions across a range of subjects. Some 27 Nobel laureates have been associated with Heidelberg University, nine of whom won the prize while tenured there.

Many influential politicians, philosophers and scientists are alumni or affiliates of the university, including Max Weber – the founder of modern sociology – and philosopher Hannah Arendt.

Heidelberg is known as the home of German romanticism and the Old Town and castle are some of the most visited tourist destinations in Germany.

 Humboldt University of Berlin

Humboldt University of Berlin is the birthplace of an educational ethos and university model that has been adopted by other European and Western universities since the 19th century.

The principle of the university is a union between teaching and research, both done by prominent scholars. Some of Germany’s most influential figures attended or worked at the university, including Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Walter Benjamin, Albert Einstein and Max Planck.

In total, 55 Nobel prizewinners are associated with Humboldt University, the majority for physics, chemistry or medicine.

Although well-known and respected across all subject areas, the university particularly excels in arts and humanities.

The university library, opened in 1874, is one of the most extensive in the country. It contains around 6.5 million books and thousands of magazines and journals.

Of almost 33,000 students, about 16 per cent are international.

 Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin is one of the largest university hospitals in Europe.

It can trace its roots back to 1710 when the hospital was built in response to the plague in Eastern Prussia. It was then rebuilt and renamed until 2003, when it merged with other medical institutes in Germany and took on its current name.

Many famous scientists and physicians have worked or studied at the university including neurologist Carl Wernicke, psychiatrist Karl Leonhard and Rahel Hirsch, the first female medical professor in Prussia.

More than half of the German Nobel prizewinners in medicine and physiology have studied or worked at the university.

University of Freiburg

Already a comprehensive university at its founding in 1457, the University of Freiburg still offers undergraduate and graduate studies as well as professorial qualification in all important disciplines today: the humanities, natural and engineering sciences, medicine, law, and theology. This diversity also provides an ideal environment for innovative interdisciplinary studies.

Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

Founded in 1737, the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen is a research university of high internationalstanding. It is well-known, not only for its remarkably diverse range of subjects, but also for its research-led teaching and outstanding scientific environment in which more than 45 Nobel laureates have lived,studied, researched and taught.

  1. Charité University of Medicine, Berlin

Charité is one of the largest university hospitals in Europe. All of our clinical care, research and teaching is delivered by physicians and researchers of the highest international standard. Charité proudly lays claim to more than half of all German Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, including Emil von Behring, Robert Koch, and Paul Ehrlich.


University of Tubingen

  • 1477 Founding of the original four faculties: Theology, Law, Medicine, Philosophy
  • 1535/36 Founding of the Evangelische Stift school of divinity for Protestant Theology
  • 1817 Founding of the Economics Faculty and the Faculty of Catholic Theology
  • 1863 Founding of the first Faculty of Science at a German university
  • 1979 The number of students tops 20,000 for the first time.

The University provides its scientists and academics with a research-friendly environment and the freedom necessary for creativity. Students are confronted with burning issues in research at an early stage, and are encouraged to take an active role in research projects. The International Center for Ethics in the Sciences and Humanities explores ethical problems arising from research.

The University values diversity and promotes equal opportunities among its members regardless of gender, social and religious background, disability and sexual orientation. It therefore also creates family-friendly conditions for students, employees, academics and scientists.

The University reinforces its basic research with outstanding performance in core areas. Its policy of targeted funding takes in collaborative research centers, research groups, research training groups and outstanding individual research, as well as partnerships with business and industry. The University also collaborates with other universities in the region and with government-funded research institutions. PhD networks help to integrate young researchers into structured doctoral studies while promoting interdisciplinary research projects. The University also provides help for young researchers whose work has potentially commercial applications.

 Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) is one of the largest and most diverse universities in Germany. Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz was originally founded in 1477 and today still strives to emulate the innovational spirit of its namesake. The promotion and introduction of new ideas, the use of knowledge to improve people’s lives and encourage them to overcome the many boundaries they encounter daily – these are the underlying ambitions of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

The list is in-exhaustive, students are advised to visit the individual school websites for the admission requirements

 

 

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